Badger Publishing

Blog Posts: 1–11 of 260
  1. Why are Posters Important and How Can We Use Them to Increase Library Circulation?

    Posted on: Feb 14, 2022
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    Posters can brighten up any library space as they capture the attention and enable discussion, which in turn encourages students to visit. When used as part of a wider library or classroom display, posters have the power not only to promote specific books but to introduce students to new subjects and concepts, encouraging them to think deeply, investigate widely and broaden their horizons.

    Posters are perfect for all your students but especially reluctant and struggling readers. They are visually engaging with clear and concise information so the material can be absorbed quickly, even at a glance. Whether it be a quote, a scientific principle or a profile of a popstar, posters can motivate and focus students in a way that other learning aids may not.

    When 65% of people worldwide find visual learning more effective it is crucial to use images and graphics to impart information within schools. Posters are one of the best (and easiest) ways to effectively achieve this in a library and classroom environment.

  2. Books to Boost Reading Confidence and Help Students Catch Up

    Books to Boost Reading Confidence and Help Students Catch Up

    Posted on: Jun 09, 2021
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    A study conducted by Renaissance Learning in 2020 showed that 63% of teachers expected that lockdown — and all the limitations that come with it — would increase the existing attainment gap for disadvantaged students. Perhaps more alarmingly, over a third of teachers indicated that they did not feel their school was prepared to measure, and subsequently act on, those attainment differences upon returning to the classroom.

    Filling gaps will no doubt be an ongoing priority for teachers as we navigate a post-lockdown landscape, with key areas of learning taking priority in the mission to catch up. Few areas are more key than literacy, and we know it is going to be a race against time to try and accelerate some students back up to the level of their peers, to reinforce the key skills that will enable them to access the rest of the curriculum. To that end, we wanted to highlight some of our best ‘reading for pleasure’ resources to provide as clear a path as possible — particularly at the all-important transition period of UKS2 to LKS3 when children need to build confidence in their literacy skills as they move on to more challenging work.

    As an experienced educational publisher that has specialised in high interest, low reading level books for nearly 20 years, we have amassed a large and varied back catalogue of engaging fiction and non-fiction to cover a wide range of interests, which we are passionate to make sure act as an ‘open door’ into reading. Our fiction is rightly made up of strands of voices from different walks of life, diverse backgrounds and ways of seeing the world, and we can provide digital resources or printed books, depending on your needs.

    Below we have provided details and recommended audiences for some of our popular series, as well as some of the key features that make our books so accessible for struggling or reluctant readers.

    You can view our entire range

  3. Welcome Back!

    Welcome Back!

    Posted on: Sep 24, 2020
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    Welcome Back

    It’s fantastic to see children back in school after so long a break, and we know how hard staff have had to work to implement all the new (and changing) procedures to get to this stage.

    Here at Badger Learning we have been working on updating our products to make sure we have what you need to ensure children are supported in their reading journey and with their wellbeing. We know that the pandemic has put a huge strain on some children’s mental health and wellbeing and as much as we hope that will all be eased now they are back at school, some will need additional resources. Primary teachers may want to take a look at our PSHE Through Stories Collection.  For secondary schools, our Minding Your Mental Health and Supporting Your Mental Health collections address a number of mental health topics through fiction and non-fiction respectively, helping teenagers realise they are not alone and opening up conversations in a relatable way.

    In these first few weeks back teachers will also have been assessing where children are at academically and looking at ways to address gaps in learning. Reading is crucial here and with the limited access to books over lockdown, a lot of children will have been reading significantly less than they would in more normal times. Supporting struggling and reluctant readers with appealing books, written by authors who specialise in accessible literature has always been a big part of what we do. Our books are all carefully assessed for Accelerated Reader™ Level, Catch-Up Level, reading age and interest age. This ensures you can place the right book in a pupil’s hand, one which will both appeal to their maturity as well as improving their fluency and comprehe

  4. #UnitedByBooks – We Need to #KeepKidsReading

    #UnitedByBooks – We Need to #KeepKidsReading

    Posted on: Apr 08, 2020
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    As parents, we know reading is better for children than watching TV or playing online games, but are we all aware how much better and why schools place such an emphasis on getting kids reading?

    With schools closed and normal life suspended for everyone we are all scrabbling around trying to think how best to support our children. Parents are taking on a new role as home educators, even though most of us have very limited experience in this and children and young people may additionally be scared, worried and frustrated.

    There are a huge number of digital resources out there, and schools will be sharing links with families on what systems they are using to keep children learning their school subjects. However, there is also a hugely important additional way you can support children academically and emotionally and that is to encourage them to read.

    Children who read for pleasure do better in school and in life than children who don’t. There are a number of academic studies showing this, and that’s why schools work so hard to push reading. This holds true, whatever the academic background of the parents and their income. Reading, and reading because you want to, not because it’s a set text, is a super-power, which has more impact on your results in school and salary after school than anything else we know of. Read the research here

    Books are also soothing, studies show reading is good for mental health, lowering stress levels and anxiety more than many other activities. (read research on this here) Reading allows you to escape into other worlds, and as you have to build the pictures in your mind of what those worlds look like, smell like and taste like, they do it better than just watching a screen. Having less is somehow more

  5. Youth Activism and Climate Change

    Youth Activism and Climate Change

    Posted on: Jan 30, 2020
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    Climate conversations are never simple, with many people finding it hard to visualise a world of climate chaos or simply refusing to do so. That is why discussions through literature are so important – they bring the pandemonium to life and aid in envisaging a ravaged world, unlike anything we have seen before.

    It feels like we are approaching the Golden Age of Young Adult ‘cli-fi’ (climate change fiction). Our worldwide news is constantly awash with ecological disasters and the beginning of 2020 has been no different with the devastating bush fires in Australia horrifying people all over the world. Although gaining popularity, very few ‘cli-fi’ novels actually deal directly with climate change but rather discuss the after-effects. Our No Planet B collection strives to raise awareness of the irreversible damage we are causing, a collection to shock but also to inspire – books that act as literary catalysts.

    No Planet B contains various ecological dystopias, each venturing into an unknown future of our world. Every title asks the reader to imagine themselves in place of the lead character as devastating environmental change brings with it the breakdown of society as we know it, posing problems of not just how to survive but how to stay human. Will they be a person of action or inaction? Would they only fend for themselves or would they help others in this time of need? Would they fall into despair or hold onto hope?

    Both Phoenix Rising and Floodworld examine a planet nearly completely underwater, a very possible future with rising sea levels threatening to engulf coastlines. How To Bee scrutinises the devastating effect of the extinction of bees, an issue that is already a reality in rural China, who use humans to artificially pollinate because pesticides have radically reduced the bee population. Dry and The Survival Game look at life on Earth with barely any

  6. Award-winning, dyslexia-friendly horror series, Papercuts has six brand new titles!

    Award-winning, dyslexia-friendly horror series, Papercuts has six brand new titles!

    Posted on: Jan 06, 2020
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    You asked for more, so here you go! We are delighted to announce that six, brand new Papercuts books will be published in January 2020. Papercuts III builds on our award-winning Papercuts I and Papercuts II series of bone-chilling horror stories for students aged 13+. Once again, our talented authors and artists have created six eye-catching and engaging books that will be sure to grab, and hold, the attention of even the most reluctant teenage reader. Each story is packed with horror and elements of the supernatural and, for the first time ever, two of the titles are sci-fi horrors set in space!

    Each book contains four full-page images interspersed throughout the text, helping readers to visualise the story, whilst retaining the appearance of a teenage novel. As with our other Papercuts titles, the books in Papercuts III have a reading age of 8–9 and a manageable word count of 5000­–6000. A dyslexia-friendly font and design is used, with bite-sized chunks of text and line spacing, along with off-white paper to reduce visual stress on sensitive eyes.

     We hope you enjoy these haunting tales as much as we do!

  7. Getting into writing with two Sides Two Sides II Author Emma Norry

    Getting into writing with two Sides Two Sides II Author Emma Norry

    Posted on: Nov 07, 2019
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    Badger publishing fans will be aware of our best-selling Two Sides series of thought-provoking stories on hard-hitting themes that are breaking new ground in accessible literature.  Emma Norry is the author of United, one of the books in the Two Sides II series, and she kindly agreed to an interview about this book and shares some tips on becoming a writer. Danny Pearson, our publisher, also gives us some insight into the commissioning process for this series and the reaction from readers.

    How did you research and prepare for writing this novel?

    My husband is a massive football fan, both playing and watching it. So… I watched games with him, tried FIFA and PES on the PlayStation and asked my son about playing at school. 

    United is a story about Zane, a football-mad teenager coming to terms with his sexuality.  He has to cope with homophobic comments from his dad and coach how do you think this affects his mental state?

    Everything is amplified when you're a teenager. The good and the bad. Teens can be sensitive about many things, a stereotype that they 'don't care' isn't necessarily true, and when you have a secret, or are particularly worried about something, it often plays on your mind a lot and can easily become all consuming. Poor Zane ends up quite depressed and finds his personality changing in some respects as the comments he hears from respected and trusted grown-ups make him doubt any faith he has in the adults around him and make him feel isolated. 

    You pack a lot into a very short story and Zane has a lot to cope with at the same time. How important was that to creating his character?

    Very important. I wanted Zane to get to a point where we almost wondered if he might snap again, and if so, what would that be like, because he had so much to cope with. Worried about his friend's new relationship, as well as trying to accept his own sexuality and possi

  8. Horror Hotel

    Horror Hotel

    Posted on: Oct 04, 2019
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    We’ve been working extra hard over the summer to make sure there are fantastic new books available for you at the start of the school year!

    And we’ve had a lot of fun developing Horror Hotel — our brand-new series of six creepy stories written by the brilliant Tim Collins. Brace yourself for some seriously scary and mysterious adventures filled with monsters, intelligent technology and an eccentric hotel manager who may or may not be there to help guests!

    Horror is perennially popular with teens, so we’ve created this series for readers aged 12+ who have a reading age of 6–7.

     

    We were thrilled to work again with talented artists Abby Ryder and James Lawrence. Take a look below at some examples of their work. Their imaginative and highly creative illustrations bring each story to life. Every double-page spread contains a perfect balance of text and illustrations, crucial for supporting reluctant or struggling readers.

    Wall Crawlers Page Spread                  Nightmare Man Page Spread

    We think you’ll agree that the front covers are pretty special too. We wanted to give the covers the look of vintage horror movie posters and our cover artist, Mark Penman, did an amazing job. The books make a great set when displayed together and will be sure to entice your students to pick up and dip into these spooky tales.

    In terms of text, a large font size, generous line spacing and low word count (500–600 words) ensure that each book is accessible and approachable. Rest assured that we haven’t compromised on content either — each exciting plot will be sure to capture the imagination and hold the

  9. Get a flying start in reading this term with Badger Learning’s FREE Guided Reading Resources!

    Get a flying start in reading this term with Badger Learning’s FREE Guided Reading Resources!

    Posted on: Sep 12, 2019
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    Our Enjoy Guided Reading range has become a go-to resource for busy teachers. To launch the new term we’d love for you to try one in the classroom for free. We’re sure once you’ve done so, you’ll be keen to come back for more. Our aim is always to give teachers the best tools for the job, saving time and delivering lessons that provide positive learning outcomes.   

    We have one FREE resource for each year group from 1–6 available, so please share this with your colleagues and teacher friends.  Every school can download all six free resources with no catches.

    FREE RESOURCES

    Year 1: Teacher notes for I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen

    Year 2: Teacher notes for The Enormous Crocodile by Roald Dahl

    Year 3: Teacher notes for The Pied Piper of Hamelin by Michael Morpurgo

    Year 4: Teacher notes for You’re a Bad Man Mr Gum by Andy Stanton

    Year 5: Teacher notes for The Astounding Broccoli Boy by Frank Cottrell-Boyce

    Year 6: Teacher notes for Trickster by Tom Moorhouse

  10. Between The Lines II

    Between The Lines II

    Posted on: Sep 05, 2019
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    Between The Lines II Poster

    We are delighted to bring you eight brand-new titles that will capture the interest and imaginations of teenage readers.

    Between The Lines II is a series of books dealing with mature and compelling themes, filling the need for age-appropriate fiction written for teenage readers with reading ages of 8–9 years.

    We’ve worked closely with a team of experienced and talented authors to create a mixture of action-packed and thought-provoking stories.

    We’re especially proud of the diverse range of plots, settings and characters within this new series. From sports clubs and schools, to unfamiliar and chilling visions of the future, stories cover the dangers of internet chat rooms, crime, grief, female empowerment, friendship, bullying, dystopian futures, and much more.

     Although limited to a maximum of 6,000 words per book and with carefully controlled language, these books have the look and feel of a real novel.

    You’ll notice that we have also used a new dyslexia-friendly font, with improved line spacing and off-white paper, to ensure that the books in this series are truly accessible to every teenage reader.

    County Lines Book Image

    County Lines is one book that will resonate particularly well with teenagers at the moment. We were hearing the topic of county lines coming up more and more frequently in conversations with teenagers and realised that it would be an important topic to cover in our new series. County lines is now making headline news and so the release of Donna David’s well-researched book is perfectly timed.

    Although Donna’s book covers difficult topics of organised crime and exploitation of teenagers, it is also hopeful, with a clear resolution at the end. If students are encountering similar issues to those covered in the book,

Blog Posts: 1–11 of 260