Library Collections

Blog Posts: 1–11 of 4
  1. Welcome Back!

    Welcome Back!

    Posted on: Sep 24, 2020
    Share:

    Welcome Back

    It’s fantastic to see children back in school after so long a break, and we know how hard staff have had to work to implement all the new (and changing) procedures to get to this stage.

    Here at Badger Learning we have been working on updating our products to make sure we have what you need to ensure children are supported in their reading journey and with their wellbeing. We know that the pandemic has put a huge strain on some children’s mental health and wellbeing and as much as we hope that will all be eased now they are back at school, some will need additional resources. Primary teachers may want to take a look at our PSHE Through Stories Collection.  For secondary schools, our Minding Your Mental Health and Supporting Your Mental Health collections address a number of mental health topics through fiction and non-fiction respectively, helping teenagers realise they are not alone and opening up conversations in a relatable way.

    In these first few weeks back teachers will also have been assessing where children are at academically and looking at ways to address gaps in learning. Reading is crucial here and with the limited access to books over lockdown, a lot of children will have been reading significantly less than they would in more normal times. Supporting struggling and reluctant readers with appealing books, written by authors who specialise in accessible literature has always been a big part of what we do. Our books are all carefully assessed for Accelerated Reader™ Level, Catch-Up Level, reading age and interest age. This ensures you can place the right book in a pupil’s hand, one which will both appeal to their maturity as well as improving their fluency and comprehe

  2. 6 Discussion Points to Celebrate International Women's Day

    6 Discussion Points to Celebrate International Women's Day

    Posted on: Feb 17, 2020
    Share:

     “We need to live in a culture that values, respects, looks up to and idolizes women as much as men.” Emma Watson

     

    Happy International Women’s Day! March the 8th is a day for celebrating the many achievements of women across the globe. It is also a day to highlight issues that still need to be solved in order to accomplish equality. The #IWD2020 theme is #EachforEqual, calling for each of us to take control of our actions and be held accountable in a world where “we can actively choose to challenge stereotypes, fight bias, broaden perceptions, improve situations and celebrate women's achievements.”

    2019 felt like a mixture of achievements and failures for women’s rights. Whilst Saudi Arabia granted women the right to drive without a male chaperone, Turkey announced the ‘marry-your-rapist’ law. In Finland women dominated the top political spots, including the youngest Prime Minister ever elected, yet the 2020 Sex and Power Index from the Fawcett Society shows that men still dominate every sector of politics, public life and business. Whilst Ireland brought in legislation so that women and girls can terminate a pregnancy without fear of being prosecuted, states across the U.S. are passing the most restrictive abortion laws in decades, potentially putting women’s lives at risk.

    6 Discussion Points for International Women's Day

    The following six topics are designed to promote awareness and discussion in the classroom.

    1. Women are 47% more likely to suffer severe injuries in car crashes because safety features are designed for men. It is true that we live in world designed for men as we consistently use data where test subjects are male. This is known as the gender data gap. What implications does this have on society? What other data is male biased? What could we do to change this?
    2. It is estimated that the gender pay gap will take around 202 years to close (World Eco
  3. Youth Activism and Climate Change

    Youth Activism and Climate Change

    Posted on: Jan 30, 2020
    Share:

    Climate conversations are never simple, with many people finding it hard to visualise a world of climate chaos or simply refusing to do so. That is why discussions through literature are so important – they bring the pandemonium to life and aid in envisaging a ravaged world, unlike anything we have seen before.

    It feels like we are approaching the Golden Age of Young Adult ‘cli-fi’ (climate change fiction). Our worldwide news is constantly awash with ecological disasters and the beginning of 2020 has been no different with the devastating bush fires in Australia horrifying people all over the world. Although gaining popularity, very few ‘cli-fi’ novels actually deal directly with climate change but rather discuss the after-effects. Our No Planet B collection strives to raise awareness of the irreversible damage we are causing, a collection to shock but also to inspire – books that act as literary catalysts.

    No Planet B contains various ecological dystopias, each venturing into an unknown future of our world. Every title asks the reader to imagine themselves in place of the lead character as devastating environmental change brings with it the breakdown of society as we know it, posing problems of not just how to survive but how to stay human. Will they be a person of action or inaction? Would they only fend for themselves or would they help others in this time of need? Would they fall into despair or hold onto hope?

    Both Phoenix Rising and Floodworld examine a planet nearly completely underwater, a very possible future with rising sea levels threatening to engulf coastlines. How To Bee scrutinises the devastating effect of the extinction of bees, an issue that is already a reality in rural China, who use humans to artificially pollinate because pesticides have radically reduced the bee population. Dry and The Survival Game look at life on Earth with barely any

  4. The Feminist Revolution

    The Feminist Revolution

    Posted on: Apr 24, 2018
    Share:

    The Feminist Revolution"The story of women's struggle for equality belongs to no single feminist nor to any one organisation but to the collective efforts of all who care about human rights."
    Gloria Steinem

    I want to start this blog post by celebrating all that women have achieved over the past year. 2017 was a big year for activism and speaking out against sexism which has led to powerful movements fuelling change, such as #TimesUp and #MeToo. This has given many women the courage to speak out against sexual misconduct across various industries. 2017 also saw a big push in promoting women in STEM, more female politicians on the world's stage than ever before, as well as F1's banishment of grid girls.
    Despite all of this progress, we are still a long way from accomplishing the original aim of IWD, which is to achieve gender equality. Current statistics show that the gender gap will not close until 2186, women are five times more likely to be sexually assaulted than a man, and that young girls as young as 5 are concerned about their body image. Not to mention issues such as FGM, sex-trafficking, and domestic abuse, it is obvious that the equality we seek is still a long way off.

    This year's IWD theme was #PressforProgress which is all about continuing global activism and the fight for equality. Here are several ways you can advocate change in your school.

    1. Download the IWD #PressforProgress selfie cards and visually share your support via social media
    2. Create a library display showcasing fantastic female authors that promote positive female role models. If you need some inspiration you can find our collection here 
    3. Invite local feminists, business leaders, or role models to your school to run a mini-lecture on their views about gender parity
    4. Host a poster competition or workshop to help raise greater awareness of
Blog Posts: 1–11 of 4